Campus Buildings

 

The following list of buildings includes major buildings existing and formerly existing on the Blacksburg campus, with the exception of certain athletic facilities and campus features listed in the sections above. Buildings no longer in existence are listed in italics.

417 Clay Street (4,958 GSF, 417 Clay Street SW)
This building (which was given to the VT Foundation by Bill Cranwell in 1986) was originally known as the Cranwell International Center. When the center left the building in 2014, it was renamed to 417 Clay Street and has offices for a division of the Dean of Students.

Agnew Hall (built 1940, 12,245 GSF, 460 West Campus Drive)
The original building was built in 1940 at a cost of $42,525 and was known as the "Home Economics Building". The building was renamed to "Agnew Hall" in 1949 for Ella Graham Agnew, founder of home demonstration work in Virginia, nation’s first woman field agent, and Extension agent employed by Virginia Agricultural and Mechanical College and Polytechnic Institute (today’s Virginia Tech) 1914-19. It was the first campus building to be named for a woman. It housed Home Economics main offices until 1968; now used by Biological Systems Engineering, Communication Network Services, and Entomology. The building was completely renovated in 2008 at a cost of $1,449,000.

Agricultural Hall—See Price.

Airport Terminal (built 1995, 6,890 GSF, 1601 Research Center Drive)

Ambler Johnston Hall (East Wing built 1969, 95,058 GSF, 700 Washington Street SW; West Wing built 1969, 176,961 GSF, 720 Washington Street SW)
The original construction cost of the entire building was $4,853,966 in 1969. The west wing is 176,961 GSF and the east wing is 95,058 GSF. The west wing was occupied by men from 1968 to 1971 when it was then occupied by women. The east wing was occupied by women from 1969 to 1971 when it was then occupied by men. The entire building was renovated in 2011 (west wing) and 2012 (east wing) for a cost of $75M. Current occupant: Coed; Honors Residential College At Ambler Johnston East, and Residential College At Ambler Johnston West. It was dedicated Oct. 17, 1969, and is named in 1968 for J. Ambler Johnston (class of 1904), a lifetime supporter of the university, former president of the Alumni Association, and a founder of Carneal and Johnston, architectural-engineering firm that designed many campus buildings.

Architecture Annex (built 1916, 15,808 GSF, 140 Otey Street NW)
This building was erected in 1916 as "Blacksburg High School" at a cost of $10,000. It was purchased by the university at auction in 1965 for $310,000 as part of a three-building package of former school buildings. It was initially used as an architecture studio; now houses landscape architecture, urban affairs, urban and regional planning, and environmental design and planning programs of the College of Architecture and Urban Studies.

Armory (built 1936, 9,300 GSF, 201 Draper Road NW)
Leased for space for the Art Department.

Arrington House (built 1950, 1,896 GSF, 103 Perry Street)
This house was demolished in September 1995.

Art And Design Learning Center (built 1931, 22,532 GSF, 355 Old Turner Street)
The original building was built in 1931 and was known as the "Mechanical Engineering Labratory." In 1953 the building was renamed to "Printing Plant" when Printing moved there from the "First Academic Building." It was renovated in 1997 when the Art Department moved in and was renamed to "Art And Design Learning Center." A portion of the building is the old power plant.

Barringer Hall (built 1962, 42,879 GSF, 240 Kent Street)
Built in 1962 for $729,244 and dedicated on May 16, 1966, and named for Paul B. Barringer, president 1907-13. It houses 220 male students.

Bishop-Favrao Hall (built 2007, 31,651 GSF, 1345 Perry Street)
Built in 2007 at a cost of $9,161,000. Named for Richard Bishop ’67, founder of Columbia Builders, member of College of Architecture and Urban Studies Advisory Council and the Building Construction Advisory Board, and key alumni donor for the building, and William Favrao, founding member and organizer of the Associated Schools of Construction, founder of the university’s building construction program in 1947 and head of the department until his death in 1977, recipient of the William E. Wine Award, and member of the Academy of Teaching Excellence.

Brodie Hall (built 1957, 65,037 GSF, 310 Alumni Mall)
The original portion of this building was built in 1900 to house cadets at a cost of $17,500 and was known as "Barracks Number 3". It was remodeled in 1958 at a cost of $165,476. The addition was built in 1957 at a cost of $556,386 on the site of the "Second Academic Building." Housed 291 cadets. In 1990s, also housed dean of students office until 1998, when the office moved to Henderson Hall. Named for William M. Brodie, professor of mathematics and sometime commandant of cadets, 1901-32. Demolition of this building began on June 11, 2015 and was completed July 28, 2015.

Brodie Hall Replacement (built 2016, 108,795 GSF, 310 Alumni Mall)
Construction started in 2016 on this new residence hall. Along with Pearson Hall, the two buildings will provide over 1,000 beds in double and triple occupancy rooms that meet the residence and in-room storage space needs of the cadets. Both new residence halls will provide dedicated meeting, community, and group spaces specifically designed to meet Corps program and organization needs.

Building 253 Completed 1921; cost of $25,000. Originally called Extension Apartment House. Remodeled 1963 for use as Women’s Auxiliary Dormitory, housing 34 women students. Turned over to ROTC department 1966-67 and later used by Information Services 1967-68; for Student Union offices 1967-69; and as offices for mathematics professors 1969 until destroyed by fire in spring 1971. University Bookstore now occupies the site.

Building 270g [College Of Science Administration Building] (built 1996, 4,900 GSF, 345 Old Turner Street)
This building was a modular building built in 1996 on the Upper Quad tennis courts as offices for the dean of the College of Arts and Science and was known as the "A&S Administration Building". It was later known as the "College Of Sciences Administration Building" when the College Of Arts And Sciences was split. This building was demolished on October 10, 2013.

Burchard Hall (built 1998, 42,143 GSF, 1327 Perry Street)
This building was built in 1998 at a cost of $8.446m and is the university’s first completely underground building. Natural light is provided by four glass pyramids constructed on Burruss Plaza. Named for Charles Burchard, founding dean of the College of Architecture and Urban Studies, 1964-79.

Burruss Hall (built 1936, 158,221 GSF, 800 Drillfield Drive)
The original building (77,080 GSF) was built in 1936 at a cost of $428,404 and was known as the "Teaching And Administration Building." The cornerstone of the original building laid at the 1935 commencement. First commencement held in 3,003-seat auditorium was June 1936. An electronic carillon, costing $28,000, was installed in 1958 and dedicated at Homecoming 1958. An addition (west wing and rear sections - 60,503 GSF) was built in 1968 at a cost of $1,536,899. An addition (east wing - 20,638 GSF) was built in 1970 at a cost of $593,729. The first floor of the rear section used to house the university’s mainframe computer systems from the 1970s to 1989 when they were moved to Andrews Information Systems Building in the Corporate Research Center. The rear section of the building (20,500 GSF) was renovated in 2007 at a cost of $2,939,000 to convert space for use by College of Architecture and Urban Studies. The building was named for Julian Ashby Burruss, eighth president 1919-45, in honor of his 25th year in office.

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Caldwell House (Price’s Fork Road, 1,536 GSF, )
This house was demolished in July 1997.

Campbell Hall (East Wing built 1940, 31,769 GSF, 320 Drillfield Drive; Main Wing built 1930, 34,734 GSF, 300 Drillfield Drive)
Main Campbell Hall was built in 1930 at a cost of $167,000 (original name: Barracks Number 8). East Campbell Hall was built in 1940 at a cost of $143,000 (original name: Barracks Number 9). The entire building was renovated 1966-1968 at a cost of $665,451 to convert it to a women’s dormitory. Now contains 67,993 sq. ft. Two floors of main Campbell organized into second Honors house (see Hillcrest), 2005-06, reaching 94 students by 2006-07. The entire building was known as Stone Dormitory or Civilian Dormitory until 1952, when it was named for Theodorick Pryor Campbell, former professor of modern languages 1889-1928, Academic Department head 1904-1928, dean of the general faculty 1913-1920, and dean of the college 1920-1924.

Cassell Coliseum (built 1963, 187,000 GSF, 675 Washington Street SW)
This building (187,000 GSF) was built in 1963 at a cost of $2,775,000. An addition (39,617 GSF) was built in 1984 on the south end at a cost of $1.83m and was originally called the Cassell Coliseum Annex and is now called the Jamerson Athletic Center and was made a separate building in 2012. An addition to the Jamerson Athletic Center (2,680 GSF) was built in 1998. The Jamerson Athletic Center (and the addition) was assigned a separate building number - 0187c. An addition was built in 2010 and is called the Football Locker Room; it too was assigned a separate building number - 0187b. Originally this building was known as the Student Activities and Physical Education Building and was renamed to Cassell Coliseum in 1976.

Cheatham Hall (built 1971, 65,247 GSF, 310 West Campus Drive)
Constructed 1971 to house forestry and wildlife sciences and dedicated on May 5, 1972. The original building (56,010 GSF) was built in 1971 at a cost of $1.67m. The addition (9,237 GSF) was built in 2003 at a cost of $2,060,000. The building was designed to accommodate two future additional floors. Named for Julian N. Cheatham, class of 1933, executive vice president and a director of Georgia-Pacific Corp. and a university benefactor.

Classroom Building (built 2016, 73,275 GSF, 1455 Perry Street)
This building has approximately 28 classrooms including auditoria, teaching labs, and lecture rooms. The building allows for flexible instruction arrangements and use of the classroom spaces. The classrooms include state-of-the-art technology, seating arrangements, and communications infrastructure to support leading pedagogy practices expected by students. The building is located on the north side campus in the core of instruction activity. The facility will seek LEED Silver certification.

Cochrane Hall (built 1983, 91,415 GSF, 770 Washington Street SW)
The original portion of the building was built in 1983 (81,114 GSF). The dining hall addition (West End Market) was built in 1998 (8,124 GSF) at a cost of $3.269M. The lounge (room 101) was built in 2003 (2,177 GSF). The West End Market was expanded and renovated (13,626 sq. ft.) in 2011 at a cost of $7,310,000. The original name of this building was New Undergraduate Facility ("NUF") and principally housed athletes; it was renamed to Cochrane Hall in 1986 for the family of James H. Cochrane Jr., a 1984 architecture graduate and university benefactor. Current occupant: Coed.

Commandant’s House Constructed in 1875 to house Gen. James H. Lane, commandant of cadets. Served as commandant’s quarters until 1900, when offices for the president, commandant, secretary, and treasurer were set up in the house and its conversion into an administration building was authorized. House razed just before World War II.

Commencement Hall Also known as Commerce Hall, German Hall, and Mess Hall at various times. Two-story brick building completed July 1894; cost $15,000. Located south of Pavilion near present junction of Main Street and northeast corner of Alumni Mall. First floor used as a mess hall and second floor for college exercises and entertainment. Enlarged in 1904-05 by addition in rear of building. Remodeled 1939 to house business administration and renamed Commerce Hall (not to be confused with a later Commerce Hall, now Pamplin Hall). Demolished in 1957.

Cowgill Hall (built 1969, 68,417 GSF, 1325 Perry Street)
Academic and administration space for the College of Architecture and Urban Studies; first building constructed expressly for architecture use. Construction began 1966; completed 1969; dedicated April 30, 1970. It was the first major departure from traditional neo-Gothic architecture in academic buildings. The original building (68,417 GSF) was built at a cost of $1,388,968. It was renovated (HVAC and power) in 2008 at a cost of $10,359,000. It was named in 1967 for Clinton R. Cowgill, founder of architecture studies and head of department of architectural engineering 1928-56.

CPAP [Neily Building] [Thomas-Conner House] (built 1878, 5,217 GSF, 104 Draper Road SW)
From the News Messenger Bicentennial Edition, July 1, 1976, page 8-h: The Thomas-Conner House, corner of Draper Road and Wall Street, is one of the finest examples of mid-19th century architecture in Blacksburg . . . . The house is reported to have been built in 1878 by William Howard Thomas of Roanoke Valley at a cost of $10,000 and was occupied in 1882. He built it for his only daughter, Mary Virginia, who married John Connor, Virginia Tech professor of mechanical arts. They had two children, a son, White B. Conner (professor at NC State) and a daughter, Betty, both deceased. Miss Betty Connor, a retired Virginia Tech professor of biology, lived in the house until her death in December, 1971. In April 1972 the house was advertised for sale and was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. William Hoy, who have converted the residence into four apartments. The following item from The Gray Jacket, October 1876, is believed to refer to this house: Mr. Will Thomas’ house on Stony Creek Street is rapidly nearing completion. The contractor, Mr. Branson is sparing no paints to make it a pretty house. He is assisted as superintendent by Cadet Blackswell. Draper Road was formerly Water Street. The bricks were made on the location. The slave quarters in the rear required two more years to build. The Thomas’s also lived in the house for many years with the Connors. They built a wooden pipe line (which can still be seen today) from the spring on Clay Street behind the Blacksburg Middle School to the spring house on the corner of their lot (now covered over). This house has been recorded by the Virginia Landmarks Commission by Nadine Allen. Warren Neily (lawyer) owned it or rented it for his law firm before the town bought the house.

Dairy Barn And Milk House / Office Building (built 1950, 13,320 GSF, Dairy Road)
This was part of the Dairy Science complex on Southgate Drive adjacent to U.S. 460 and the veterinary college. The entire site was demolished in 2016 to accomdate extension of the airport runway and clear zone.

Davidson Hall (built 2014, 66,023 GSF, 1040 Drillfield Drive)
The original building (the 3 front floors and part of the middle section - 43,201 GSF) was built in 1928 at a cost of $170,000 and was known as the Chemical Laboratory. An addition (the fourth front floor and the rest of the middle section - 17.756 GSF) was built in 1933 at a cost of $60,000. An addition (the 3 rear floors - 19,008 GSF) was built in 1938 at a cost of $75,000. The building was completely renovated in 1965 ($282,209) and in 1981 ($164,917). The middle and rear sections (63,990 GSF) were demolished on May 11, 2012 and the replacement addition (50,048 GSF) was built in 2014 at a cost of $31,118,739. The front section was closed in February 2017 for renovation. It is named for Robert James Davidson, professor 1891-1915; dean of scientific department 1903-13; and dean of Department of Applied Science 1913-15.

Derring Hall (built 1969, 207,929 GSF, 926 West Campus Drive)
The original building (207,848 GSF) was built in 1969 at a cost of $5,091,437. The addition (81 GSF) was built in 1996 to add room 2099. The original design called for "Hokie Stone" veneer but, due to a quarry study that indicated that not enough limestone was available, the veneer was changed to brick. It is named for Paul N. Derring, YMCA secretary, director of religious activities, student activities building manager 1918-64.

Dietrick Hall (built 1970, 92,907 GSF, 285 Ag Quad Lane)
The original building (92,907 GSF) was built in 1970 at a cost of $2,806,209 and was at that time, the largest collegiate dining facility in the country as it was capable of serving 3,000 students at a single meal. The building was renovated (HVAC was replaced) in 1999 at a cost of $2,946,526, and again (servery and HVAC replacement) in 2004 at a cost of $6,494,000. It is named in 1968 for Leander B. Dietrick, former teacher, extension director, and agriculture dean 1923-62.

Duck Pond Gazebo (built 1989, 547 GSF, 806 Duck Pond Drive)

Durham Hall (built 1997, 107,929 GSF, 1145 Perry Street)
Durham Hall was built in 1997 at a cost of $16,228,000 and opened for classes in spring 1998. It was initially called the New Engineering Building; it was renamed in 2000 to Durham Hall for Frederick Dewey Durham, class of 1921, university supporter and co-founder of Dover Corp.

Dutch Barn-See Library (Old).

Eggleston Hall (East Wing built 1940, 20,629 GSF, 500 Drillfield Drive; Main Wing built 1935, 44,355 GSF, 440 Drillfield Drive; West Wing built 1940, 43,529 GSF, 410 Drillfield Drive)
Main Eggleston Hall was built in 1935 at a cost of $171,899. East Eggleston Hall was built in 1940 at a cost of $103,430. West Eggleston Hall was built in 1940 at a cost of $138,264. The residence hall was originally known as East Stone Dormitory Number 1 until it was renamed in 1952. East, Main, and West Eggleston were completely renovated in 1966 at a cost of $741,564 when it was converted to a women’s dormitory. East Eggleston Hall, including the tower, was converted to an academic and administrative building in 1983. Floors 2 through 5 of East Eggleston Hall were reconverted back to dormitory space during the summer of 2015. Current occupant: Coed. It was named in 1952 for Joseph D. Eggleston, seventh president 1913-19.

Electric Service Facility (built 2003, 30,715 GSF, 601 Energy Drive)
This building was built in 2003 at a cost of $3,000,000.

Engel Hall (built 1961, 45,737 GSF, 340 West Campus Drive)
The building was built in 1961 at a cost of $1,181,944 and dedicated Nov. 3, 1961. The building was originally called the Biochemistry and Nutrition Building. It was later renamed to the Biochemistry Building and later to Engel Hall for Ruben W. Engel, founding head of Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition 1952-66; associate dean, School of Agriculture 1966-78; VPI on-site advisor to the Philippine National Nutrition Program 1968-78.

English Field At Union Park (built 1996, 2,453 GSF, 260 Duck Pond Drive)
This baseball stadium was renamed from English Baseball Field and Pressbox to English Field at Union Park by the Board of Visitors on March 21, 2016 in recognition of Union Bank and Trust’s support of Virginia Tech athletics and the Pamplin College of Business.

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Faculty Row Houses for professors; six constructed 1893-94 along a lane in vicinity of today’s Pamplin Hall, Burruss Hall, and Norris Hall, with the sidewalk from the Liberal Arts Building through the Burruss tunnel and to the rear of Davidson defining the "row." Trees added along row of houses in spring 1900. Additional houses were built across the campus to house faculty and staff members, then moved or demolished as space was needed. The last houses on Faculty Row were removed between 1958 and 1960.

Femoyer Hall (built 1949, 35,538 GSF, 280 Stanger Street)
Femoyer Hall was built as a residence hall on the upper quad in 1949 at a cost of $401,888. Now houses various offices that serve students. Named in 1949 for 2/Lt. Robert E. Femoyer, class of 1944, who received, posthumously, the Medal of Honor in World War II.

Field House The original field house was built in 1914 and burned down in 1923; it was located on a site approximately halfway between Newman Library and Eggleston dormitory.

First Academic Building Cornerstone of this two-story, 135 x 45-ft. brick building laid Aug. 12, 1875; cost $18,000; occupation commenced October 1876. Administrative offices were moved from Preston and Olin Building into First Academic Building 1876, remained until 1899. Other uses of the building included mess hall 1882-91, printing plant 1923-53, and various other departments from time to time. Razed 1957 to make way for new section of Rasche Hall.

Fleet Services Building (built 1970, 9,536 GSF, 255 Sterrett Drive)
Original building (5,165 GSF) was built in 1970 and was called the Motor Pool. It was renamed to the Fleet Services Building in July, 2013. An addition (99 GSF) was added in 1994. The building was then extended out both ends (4,290 GSF) in 2009 at a cost of $1,075,000.

Food Science And Technology Laboratory (built 1968, 45,678 GSF, 360 Duck Pond Drive)
The original building (13,272 GSF) was built in 1952 at a cost of $311,911. An addition (7,392 GSF) was built in 1965 at a cost of $129,530. Another addition (25,014 GSF) was built in 1968 at a cost of $784,323. This building was originally called the Meat Processing Laboratory and was later renamed to the Food Science and Technology Laboratory.

Fralin Biotechnology Center (built 1995, 44,324 GSF, 360 West Campus Drive)
The building was built in 1995 at a cost of $9 million.It is named for Horace Grover Fralin, class of 1948, co-founder of Fralin and Waldron in Roanoke, Va.; founding member, Virginia Tech Corporate Research Center; president, Virginia Tech Foundation; member, Virginia Tech Board of Visitors; recipient of 1992 William H. Ruffner Medal.

Golf Course Club House (built 1910, 3,274 GSF, 1085 Duck Pond Drive)
This building was built as a private home.

Goodwin Hall (built 2014, 154,935 GSF, 635 Price’s Fork Road)
This building was built in 2014 at a cost of $95,218,249. The building’s original name was Signature Engineering Building; it was renamed to Goodwin Hall by the Board Of Visitors on 09/15/2014 in honor of Alice and Bill Goodwin.

Graduate Life Center At Donaldson Brown (built 1967, 106,424 GSF, 155 Otey Street NW)
The original building (38,965 GSF) was built in 1935 at a cost of $178,721 and was originally known as the Faculty Center; it provided faculty apartments and a public dining area. The addition (67,459 GSF) was built in 1967 at a cost of $1,806,703 and the building was renamed to CEC (Continuing Education Center) and later to Donaldson Brown Center for Continuing Education. In 1995, the building was renamed to Donaldson Brown Hotel and Conference Center, and in 2006, it was renamed to Graduate Life Center at Donaldson Brown. The newer section is located on site of former reflecting pool. A 1992 flood resulted in $4 million in damage, and the facility was then remodeled and updated. Further improvements followed in 1998 (58,892 sq. ft. renovated); cost was $3,946,000. Remodeled for use as Graduate Life Center at Donaldson Brown in 2006; cost was $3,250,000. Named for Frank Donaldson Brown 1902, former DuPont and General Motors executive and long-time benefactor of the university. He enrolled at the age of 13, and when he graduated with a B.S. in electrical engineering at age 17, he was the youngest student ever to receive a degree from Virginia Tech.

Grounds Building (built 1962, 20,644 GSF, 185 Sterrett Drive)
The original building (20,116 GSF) was built in 1962 at a cost of $154,185. The addition (528 GSF) was built in 1998. The original name of this building was Central Stores.

Hahn Garden Pavilion and Horticulture Gardens (built 2006, 2,377 GSF, 200 Garden Lane)
The gardens were first proposed in 1984 by horticulture department and have been enlarged over the years to encompass 5.75 acres; 5.5 acres are currently developed. Included are a spectrum perennial border, bright perennial border, dwarf conifer display, trident maple alee, shade beds, small pond, wisteria arbor, xeriscape area, Jane Andrews Memorial Stream Garden, Matt Petrasy Memorial Gazebo, and Peggy Lee Hahn Garden Pavilion. The gazebo was added in 1998. The pavilion was completed June 9, 2006; 2,377 sq. ft. at a cost of $825,000, and dedicated on June 16, 2006. It is named for Peggy Lee Hahn, wife of President-emeritus T. Marshall Hahn, president 1962-74, to recognize her love of gardening and her outstanding service as first lady. Money for construction and expansion of garden ($1.475 million) donated by President-emeritus Hahn.

Hahn Hall—North Wing (built 2004, 85,051 GSF, 900 West Campus Drive)
This building was originally called Chemistry-Physics Building when it was built in 2004 at a cost of $26,774,000. It was dedicated on Oct. 16, 2009, and named for T. Marshall Hahn Jr., president 1962-74.

Hahn Hall—South Wing (built 1988, 71,106 GSF, 800 West Campus Drive)
Phase I, known as Chemistry Phase I Research Laboratories, was built in 1988 (40,000 GSF) at a cost of $12.8 million. Chemistry-Physics Phase II was built in 2002 (31,106 GSF) at a cost of $22 million. The building was renamed to Hahn Hall in 1991. It was renamed to Hahn Hall—South Wing in April of 2009.

Hahn House President’s home 1971-87. Constructed 1971 by T. Marshall Hahn Jr., president 1962-74, who wanted to live off-campus; 4,617 sq. ft. finished space. Colonial-style home on Rainbow Ridge in Highland Park section of Blacksburg. Donated to Virginia Tech Foundation by Georgia-Pacific Foundation in 1974 as a permanent residence for Virginia Tech presidents. Hahn’s successor, William E. Lavery, president 1975-87, next occupied the house, the last president to do so. Sold 1991. At the end of Lavery’s term, The Grove was remodeled and has been used by all succeeding presidents (see The Grove).

Hancock Hall (built 1990, 63,075 GSF, 490 Old Turner Street)
This building was built in 1990 at a cost of $9.1m. A renovation in 2002 cost $1.8m to provide two laboratories and gas handling area for materials engineering program. Named for John W. Hancock Jr., long-time Virginia Tech benefactor and president of John W. Hancock Jr. Inc.

Harper Hall (built 1999, 72,785 GSF, 240 West Campus Drive)
Harper Hall was built in was built in 1999 at a cost of $10m. Current occupant: coed. It was dedicated on Oct. 15, 1999. It is named for Laura Jane Harper, first woman academic dean and founding dean of the School of Home Economics 1960-80, which evolved into today’s College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences.

Health And Safety Building (built 1970, 7,333 GSF, 675 Research Center Drive)
This building was originally known as Poultry Research Lab.

Henderson Hall (built 1951, 40,540 GSF, 195 Alumni Mall)
The original building was built in 1876 at a cost of $4,202 and was the President’s house. The house was first used by the first president, Charles Landon Carter Minor. In 1902, the new president’s house was built and this building was converted to the student infirmary with an addition that was added in 1902 at a cost of $8,298 and another addition that was added in 1929 at a cost of $25,000. The total GSF of the old president’s house and the infirmary wings was 15,455 sq. ft. The hospital wing was built in 1951 (25,085 GSF) at a cost of $425,936; it was completely renovated in 2009 at a cost of $12,130,000. The building now houses departments in the School of the Arts. It is named for Dr. William F. Henderson, college physician 1890-1935.

Hillcrest Hall (built 1940, 47,768 GSF, 385 West Campus Drive)
Original building (29,413 GSF) was built in 1940 at a cost of $124,313; it was the first residence hall built specifically to house women and was promptly named the "Skirt Barn" by the male students. The east wing (18,355 GSF) was added in 1971 at a cost of $667,065 when the building was converted for use as a male athletic dormitory. After Cochrane Hall became the athletic dormitory in 1983, this building was used as a graduate student dormitory. In 2000, this building was used as the residence for honors students. Current occupant: coed.

Holden Hall (built 1940, 46,800 GSF, 445 Old Turner Street)
The original building (42,130 GSF) was built in 1940 at a cost of $157,239. The auditorium and its basement (4,670 GSF) was moved on paper from Norris Hall in 2007 and is now considered part of Holden Hall (room 190). The building’s original name was Engineering Laboratory; it was then known as the Mineral Industries Building until it was renamed to Holden Hall in 1949 for Roy J. Holden, geology department head 1905-45.

Holtzman Alumni Center (built 2005, 29,203 GSF, 901 Price’s Fork Road)
The alumni center is part of a complex that includes The Inn at Virginia Tech & Skelton Conference Center; the entire complex cost $43,118,000; the alumni center was approx. $10 million of that figure. It is named for William Holtzman, class of 1959, president and founder of Holtzman Oil Corp. and generous supporter of the center.

Horticulture Built in 1888-89 as an Agricultural Experiment Station and dubbed the “Bug House” by cadets. Occupied by experiment station, 1890-1907; known as Horticultural Hall 1907-14; occupied by Agricultural Extension Division 1914-24; used by academic departments 1924-33; used by women students for various purposes 1933-35. Sat on a site slightly southwest of present day Burruss Hall. Razed January 1936 to make way for approaches to Burruss Hall.

Human and Agricultural Biosciences Building 1 (built 2013, 93,860 GSF, 1230 Washington Street SW)
This building is assigned to Virginia Cooperative Extension and Agriculture Experiment Station Division. The advanced agricultural research laboratory facility is located at the intersection of Duck Pond Drive and Washington Street. The Human & Agricultural Biosciences Building I is the first of four buildings planned for the Human & Agricultural Biosciences precinct. The 93,860-square-foot (sf) building is home to some of the most cutting-edge and advanced technologies available,in addition to common areas and shared spaces that increase creative collaboration.

Hutcheson Hall (built 1940, 50,637 GSF, 250 Drillfield Drive)
The original building (39,280 GSF) was built in 1940 at a cost of $206,000. The addition (11,357 GSF) was built in 1950. The original name of the building was New Agricultural Hall and was renamed to Hutcheson Hall in 1956. It is named for Thomas Barksdale Hutcheson, class of 1906, agronomy department head 1914-45 and dean of agriculture 1946-50, and his brother, John Redd Hutcheson, class of 1907, director of agricultural extension 1919-45, ninth president 1945-47, chancelor 1947-56, and president of the VPI Foundation 1948-62. The entire fourth floor was designed to be a library (possibly the campus library until Newman Library was built).

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Institute for Critical Technologies and Applied Science (ICTAS) II (built 2010, 42,190 GSF, 1075 Life Science Circle)
This building was built in 2010 for a cost of $35m. It is home to research laboratories, office space, and conference rooms. Research activity includes applied environmental biochemistry, fluvial processes, a global laboratory for bioinspired science and technology, nanobiology, nonlinear imaging and spectroscopy, organic nanostructures, pathogen ecology, pipeline corrosion, sustainable water, and a humanoid hospital.

Infectious Disease Research Facility (built 2011, 15,707 GSF, 295 Duck Pond Drive)
This building was built in 2011 for a cost of $10,163,000. It is a part of the Center for Molecular Medicine and Infectious Diseases and is located adjacent to the veterinary teaching hospital. It houses college faculty specializing on immunology, infectious diseases, autoimmunity, and regenerative medicine.

Institute For Society, Culture And Environment (built 1914, 5,539 GSF, 230 Grove Lane)
This building was originally called the Home Management House. The original building (5,539 GSF) was built in 1914 at a cost of $11,418. It was extensively renovated in 1959 at a cost of $7,162. This building was renamed from Wallace Annex to Institute for Society, Culture and Environment on 08/29/2014.

Johnson Hall (built 1965, 35,960 GSF, 500 Washington Street SW)
This building was built in 1965 at a cost of $544,603 to be a male dormitory. It was converted in 1970 to a female dormitory. Current occupant: female. It is named for J. S. A. Johnson 1898, faculty member 1900-31, assistant commandant and commandant of cadets 1898-1906, head of mechanical engineering 1918-31, and Engineering Experiment Station’s first director 1920-31.

Johnston Student Center (built 1990, 24,556 GSF, 920 West Campus Drive)
This student activities building was built in 1990 at a cost of $2.9m. It is named for G. Burke Johnston, English faculty member 1930-33, dean of School of Applied Science and Business Administration 1950-61, dean of School of Science and General Studies 1961-63, first dean of College of Arts and Sciences 1963-65, and C. P. Miles Professor of English 1965-74. The second floor lounge named for William Addison “Add” Caldwell, first student to register in 1872; dedicated March 19, 1993.

Keister House (Price’s Fork Road)
This house was demolished (date unknown) to allow for the widening of Price’s Fork Road.

Kelly Hall (built 2008, 99,411 GSF, 325 Stanger Street)
This building was built in 2008 at a cost of $45,986,000. This building’s original name was Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science—Building 1 (ICTAS); it was renamed to Hugh and Ethel Kelly Hall by the Board of Visitors on March 25, 2013 and will be known simply as Kelly Hall. Hugh Kelly, who died in 1989, earned his bachelor’s of electrical engineering in 1937 and a master’s degree in that subject a year later, worked at AT&T’s Bell Laboratories, and played important roles in groundbreaking projects, including the 1962 launch of the Telstar communications satellite, the first private venture in space. Ethel Kelly, who died in 2012, generously supported Virginia Tech’s College of Engineering as a way of honoring her husband’s legacy.

Kroehling Advanced Materials Foundry (built 2010, 4,175 GSF, 145 Inventive Lane)
This building was built in 2010 for a cost of $743,036. This building was originally known as the VT-Fire Building (Virginia Tech Foundry Institute for Research and Education). It was renamed to Kroehling Advanced Materials Foundry by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors on March 22, 2010. It is named for John H. Kroehling, a decorated World War II veteran and 1948 graduate of the College of Engineering, who spent 20 years at DuPont working in metal foundries and the refractories industry. He also founded his own company, J.H. Kroehling Associates Inc. The 4,500-square-foot, $1.7 million facility includes a 125-kilowatt induction furnace capable of melting aluminum, copper and bronze, iron and steel, various mold making equipment including no-bake and ceramic shell, a rapid prototype, and other high-tech equipment that students likely will find themselves using upon entry into the metal casting and related industries.

Lane Stadium (built 1965, 296,439 GSF, 185 Beamer Way)
The original structure, designed to seat 35,000 fans, was built in 1965 at a cost of $2,113,047 to replace Miles Stadium (located on Pritchard Prairie directly behind War Memorial Gymnasium). The upper east stands (12,500 seats) was added in 1977 at a cost of $3.17m. The south endzone stands (11,120 seats) were added in 2002 at a cost of $34,098,000. The west sideline expansion (11,000 seats) was added in 2005 at a cost of $57,251,000. There are a total of 66,233 permanent seats. A modern lighting system was added in 1982 and was replaced in 2005. In 2001, Worsham Field received a top-of-the-line natural grass turf, drainage, an air vacuum and blower system, and remote monitoring and control of field conditions and maintenance procedures; cost $1,366,500. The stadium and playing field were financed completely through private funds and gifts.

Latham Hall (built 2006, 84,277 GSF, 220 Ag Quad Lane)
This building was built in 2006 at a cost of $28,479,000. This building is assigned to the Virginia Cooperative Extension and Agriculture Experiment Station Division. It was dedicated Sept. 22, 2006. It is named for William C. Latham, class of 1955 and Elizabeth H. Latham, founders of Budget Motels Inc. William Latham served two terms on Virginia Tech Board of Visitors and on National Leadership Campaign Committee for university’s Alumni and Conference Center Campaign; filled leadership roles in two earlier Virginia Tech capital campaigns; served on Pamplin Advisory Council, Alumni Association Board, and Virginia Tech Foundation board; and received the 1996 Alumni Distinguished Service Award.

Lavery Hall (built 2012, 77,301 GSF, 430 Old Turner Street)
This building was built in 2012 for a cost of $45,153,000. This building was initially known as the Academic and Student Affairs Building. It was renamed by the Board of Visitors on March 26, 2012 to Lavery Hall for William E. Lavery, 12th president 1975-87. The building contains Turner Place, a state-of-the-art dining facility on the academic side of campus. With glass walls and grand entrances throughout, Turner Place has a light, open feel. Housing eight separate restaurants, it offers a variety of cuisine that includes national brands and unique venues. To replace Schultz dining hall as a corps of cadets dining hall, a 256–seat community room is located on the first floor of Turner Place. It is the regimental dining room for the corps of cadets formation dinners and will be open to the general public when not in use by the corps.

Lee Hall (built 1966, 159,278 GSF, 570 Washington Street SW)
Current occupant: coed. It was dedicated May 30, 1968. It is named for Claudius Lee, class of 1896, electrical engineering faculty member 1896-1946.

Liberal Arts Building (built 1899, 15,900 GSF, 200 Stanger Street)
Two students thought during the 1894-1895 term that (then) V.P.I. should have a Young Men’s Christian Association Building and they set about to make it happen. A effort to raise funds was started; about two years into the project, Mr. Lawrence Priddy became involved and from then on the project was almost entirely his responsibility. In a 1913 report on the history of the building, it was stated that, "without his tireless energy the work could not have gone on." Priddy worked to raise subscriptions and donations for the construction, so that, according to the report, "In the spring of 1899 the plans for the building were prepared by Mr. W. F. West, an architect of Richmond, Virginia, and were finally adopted, after Mr. Priddy had obtained the advice and suggestions of the leading authorities on Y. M. C. A. work in this country. At the time the design was considered a model for a college Y. M. C. A. Building. In the spring of 1900, with appropriate and imposing ceremonies, the cornerstone was laid in the presence of a large body of interested spectators. The speakers on this occasion were Dr. R. S. McArthur, the noted divine of New York; Dr. J. M. McBryde, the President of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute; and Mr. Lawrence Priddy, of New York, whom Dr. McArthur characterized as "the most consistent, persistent, and insistent beggar I have ever seen." The building was pushed to rapid completion by Mr. Wesley Gray, the contractor, being built of native limestone [known today as Hokie Stone] and trimmed with sandstone brought from Ohio. With the exception of the trimming, all the building material came from the State of Virginia." (Bulletin of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, October 1913, Volume VI, No. 4, pp. 44-46) The YMCA offices moved out in 1937, and the building was known as the Military Building until 1966 when it became the Student Personnel Building. It was named the Performing Arts Building in the 1972 and then to the Liberal Arts Building in 2008. The YMCA in 1972 deeded any interest it had in the building to Virginia Tech as part of the university’s centennial observances. The building is undergoing renovation in 2017.

Library (Old)—Also known as Auditorium and Chapel. Completed May 1905; burned 1953 after being vacated. First building constructed on campus in neo-Gothic architectural style and covered with native limestone, which was used instead of brick as originally planned. Used as both a chapel and an auditorium, 1905-09; as an auditorium, dance hall, and gymnasium, 1909-14; as a library, 1914-1953. Nicknamed “Dutch Barn” 1904-14. Used for commencement ceremonies 1905. First intercollegiate basketball game played here Jan. 22, 1909, when VPI beat Emory & Henry 30-18. Used for all home basketball games 1909-14, when Field House was completed. Destroyed by fire in 1953 once emptied of books and vacated in preparation for construction of new library. Carol M. Newman Library now occupies the site (see Newman, Carol M.).

Library Storage Facility (built 1995, 16,304 GSF, 600 Energy Drive)
This building was built in 1995 for a cost of $2.1m. It provides high-density storage of little-used books in the library collection, which frees up space in the main library. It is also the records management facility for the university, where records are stored until they are destroyed; archive records are also stored there.

Life Sciences I Facility (built 2008, 71,799 GSF, 970 Washington Street SW)
This building was built in 2008 at a cost of $39,847,000.

Litton-Reaves Hall (built 1981, 146,267 GSF, 175 West Campus Drive)
The building was originally built in 1981 at a cost of $9.634m. This building was originally known as the Animal Sciences Building and was renamed to Litton-Reaves Hall in March of 1989 for George W. Litton and Paul M. Reaves, two former professors and leaders in the animal industry, each of whom served Virginia Tech for 40 years. A renovation was done in 2008 for a cost of $4,129,000 to correct structural problems with the exterior wall.

Lomascolo House (built 1934, 3,554 GSF, Perry Street)
This house (3,554 GSF) was originally built in 1934. It was demolished in August 1988.

Lumenhaus (built 2009, 800 GSF, 1317 Perry Street)
Lumenhaus is the third solar house designed and built at Virginia Tech as part of a research program begun in 2002. An innovative design integrating architecture and technology, the project won the International Solar Decathlon Competition in Madrid, Spain in June of 2010. In January, 2012, it was announced that the Lumenhaus has won a 2012 AIA honor award for architecture. This is the first time this award has been given to a university team.

Lyric Theater (built 1926, 7,000 GSF, 135 College Avenue)
This movie theater was opened on April 17, 1930, and operated until 1989 when competition resulted in its closure. The university leased the space for classroom space until 1991. A local citizens group worked to renovate and reopen the theater. In February 1996, the Lyric was reopened for the first time in eight years. The theater was operated as a partially renovated space for two years while money was being raised for the full-scale renovations. The second grand opening was in 1999 following renovation. The theater continues to operate, showing second-run films and providing a space for concerts.

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Major Williams Hall (built 1957, 75,287 GSF, 220 Stanger Street)
The two original portions of the building were: 1) built in 1904 at a cost of $18,000 and known as Barracks Number 5; and 2) built in 1927 at a cost of $106,267 and known as Barracks Number 6. The addition built in 1957 at a cost of $130,639 joined the two original portions of the building which were remodeled at the same time at a cost of $226,191. An addition (10,614 GSF) was built in 1995 at a cost of $6.2m and the space was renovated and converted from a residence hall to academic. It is named for Marine Maj. Lloyd William Williams 1907, hero of World War I, to whom is attributed one of more famous statements of that war: “Retreat? Hell, no!”.

McBryde Hall (Old) (completed 1917; 58,776 sq. ft.; cost $127,596)
First phase dedicated June 1914. It was the first campus building constructed of native stone in the neo-Gothic style and native limestone (t had been planned as a brick building but native limestone used when brick was unavailable). Razed 1966. Located on site of current McBryde Hall. It was named for John M. McBryde, fifth president 1891-1907.

McBryde Hall (built 1971, 132,224 GSF, 225 Stanger Street)
The original building (123,000 GSF) was built in 1971 at a cost of $3,933 072. An addition consisting of the auditorium (9,090 GSF) was built in 1973 at a cost of $565,765. An addition (154 GSF) was built in 1998 to accomodate the handicapped lift. The 1971 building replaced the original building on the same site but retained the McBryde Hall name.

McComas Hall (built 1998, 145,225 GSF, 895 Washington Street SW)
The original building (118,225 GSF) was built in 1998 at a cost of $21,632,420 and was called the Student Health and Fitness Center. It houses Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center, Charles W. Shiffert Health Center, and Department of Recreational Sports. Facilities include three gymnasium/volleyball courts, cardio/weight training area, swimming pool, aerobic studios, suspended running track, locker rooms, and vending and lounge area. It is named for James D. McComas, president 1988-94.

McCoy House (built 1920, 1,476 GSF, Research Center Drive)
This house was built in 1920 and demolished on 03/09/2004. The airport director lived in this house.

Media Annex (built 1920, 5,076 GSF, 130 Otey Street NW)
This building was erected in 1920 at a cost of $8,000 as the Agricultural Building for the Montgomery County School Board to house agriculture and shop programs for students from all parts of county. It was purchased by the university at auction in 1965 for $310,000 as part of a three-building package.

Media Building (built 1934, 12,618 GSF, 101 Draper Road NW)
This building was erected in 1934 as Blacksburg Elementary School. It was purchased by the university in 1965 as part of a three-building package. It was used by student organizations from 1966 to 1969 while Squires was closed for renovation. University Relations occupied the building until 2017, using the space for offices for writers, editors, graphic designers, and photographers. There was a photo studio on the first floor and recording studios on the second floor. The building is now being used by the Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech.

Miles Hall (built 1964, 41,450 GSF, 410 Washington Street SW)
This residence hall was built in 1964 at a cost of $657,375. It was dedicated May 16, 1966 and is named for C. P. “Sally” Miles, class of 1901, chemistry instructor 1901-03, instructor and professor of foreign languages 1903-20 and 1935-56, director of athletics 1921-35, and dean of the college 1943-50.

Military Building / Laundry (built 1936, 36,333 GSF, 320 Stanger Street)
The original building (28,991 GSF) was built in 1936 and was known as the Utilities Building. The laundry addition was 7,342 GSF (year unknown). The laundry (11,997 sq. ft.) was renovated in 1998, cost $905,000, to house the Virginia Power Electronics Center. The building now houses Air Force and Army ROTC programs.

Monteith Hall (built 1949, 35,960 GSF, 171 Turner Street NW)
The original building was built in 1949 at a cost of $405,530 as a residence hall. It was completely renovated in 1970. It was named in 1949 for 1/Lt. Jimmie Waters Monteith Jr., class of 1941, who received the Medal of Honor posthumously for heroic actions in D-Day invasion, World War II.

Moore House [Psychological Services Center] (built 1920, 5,855 GSF, 3110 Price’s Fork Road)
This house houses the Psychological Services Center.

Moss Arts Center (built 2013, 147,382 GSF, 190 Alumni Mall)
The original building, named Shultz Hall (55,390 GSF), was built in 1962 at a cost of $1,069,925 as a dining hall; it also contained a snack bar and small satellite book store; 2,000 students could eat there at one time. One of the three dining rooms (south side of the building) was converted to a TV studio (7,415 GSF) in 2001 at a cost of $1,495,000. The building was completely renovated from 2011 through 2013 and an addition (91,992 GSF) was built for a total project cost of $100,087,000 to house the Center for the Arts. The building was renamed in 2013 to Moss Arts Center in honor of P. Buckley Moss.

Multidiscipline Lab (built 1956, 1,852 GSF, Price’s Fork Road)
This building was originally known as Bio-Chemistry and Nutrition Building.

New Hall West (built 2009, 92,800 GSF, 190 West Campus Drive)
This residence hall was built in 2009 at a cost of $30,634,000. In addition to being a coed residence hall, it contains offices for Student Programs administration, Fraternity and Sorority Life, Housing and Dining Services, Residence Life, Student Conduct, and Division of Student Affairs support services.

New Residence Hall East (built 1998, 63,195 GSF, 590 Washington Street SW)
This residence hall was built in 1998 at a cost of $8,403,000.

Newman Hall (built 1964, 55,017 GSF, 200 Kent Street)
This residence hall was built in 1964 at a cost of $872,472. It was originally a men’s dormitory and was converted to a women’s dormitory in 1970, now is coed. It was named in 1964 for Walter Stephenson Newman, associate professor of vocational education 1922-25, vice president 1946-47, 10th president 1947-62, and president emeritus 1962-78.

Newman, Carol M., Library (original construction 1955, addition built 1980, 226,630 GSF, 560 Drillfield Drive)
The original building (111,595 GSF) was built in 1955 at a cost of $1,770,761 on the site of an earlier library. The Old Dominion Foundation, headed by Paul Mellon, donated $1 million in 1953 to go with another $1 million approved in 1952 by the Virginia General Assembly. The library opened on Sept. 17, 1955, and was dedicated on May 11, 1956. Original building renovation and a six-story addition (115,035 GSF) were completed in 1981, financed by a bond referendum passed 1977, at a cost of $7.8 million. The new first-floor lobby was renovated in 1999 to accommodate a coffee shop; cost $142,000, a class gift. It is named for Carol M. Newman, professor and head of English department 1903-41.

Norris Hall (built 1962, 67,705 GSF, 495 Old Turner Street)
The original building, the west wing, (32,400 GSF) was built in 1960 at a cost of $377,983. The addition, the east wing, (39,975 GSF) was built in 1962 at a cost of $529,100. The auditorium and its basement (4,670 GSF) was moved (on paper) from Norris Hall to Holden Hall (now room 190) in 2007. The second floor of the west wing was site of 30 faculty and student deaths at hands of a student gunman on April 16, 2007 (2 others died in Ambler Johnston Hall). The wing renovated fall 2008-March 2009 to house Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics and the Center for Peace Studies and Violence Prevention offices and laboratories; cost approximately $1 million. The building’s original name was Engineering Building; it was named in 1967 for Earle B. Norris, dean of engineering 1928-52 and director of Engineering Experiment Station 1932-52.

O’Shaughnessy Hall (built 1966, 69,211 GSF, 530 Washington Street SW)
Construction of this residence hall started in 1965; completed in 1966; the cost was included in $4,500,000 bond issue for Lee, O’Shaughnessy, and Johnson residence halls. It was dedicated on May 30, 1968. It is named for Louis O’Shaughnessy, class of 1903, professor 1904-06 and 1918-54, head of applied mechanics 1932-48, acting dean of engineering 1927-28, and director of graduate studies 1936-49. Current occupant: coed.

Observatory (built 1974, 410 GSF, 1388 Old Mill Road)

Old Security Building (built 1890, 9,316 GSF, 310 Stanger Street)
This building was originally known as the Laundry when it was built in 1890 and enlarged in 1929. By 1932-33, students were using the facility for a cleaning and pressing shop so the name was changed to Cleaning. It was also at one time called the Plumbing Shop. It was called Bldg. 201 until the name was changed to the Security Building in 1974 when it housed the university security department (later Virginia Tech Police). It was later changed to Old Security when the Police Department moved to larger quarters in the Sterrett Facilities Complex. It now houses offices for the College of Science.

Owens Hall (built 1939, 97,668 GSF, 150 Kent Street)
The original building was built in 1939 at a cost of $358,212 and seated 2,240 students. When completed, it covered the greatest area of any structure on campus. It was renovated in 1959 at a cost of $160,000. An addition on the side was built in 1970. "D" room closed in 1987 for conversion to banquet facility. The building was again renovated in 1991. Hokie Grill opened 1991. It won a Bronze Award from American School and University Magazine for outstanding interior design 1992. It was named in 1952 for J. J. “Pop” Owens, mess steward 1917-40. The lower floor originally housed the campus book store and a snack bar.

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Pack Building (built 1987, 11,678 GSF, 526 Price’s Fork Road)
This leased building on the corner of Prices Fork Road and Toms Creek Road houses offices for the Office of International Research, Education, and Development.

Pamplin Hall (built 1987, 104,938 GSF, 880 West Campus Drive)
The original building (49,060 GSF) was built in 1957 at a cost of $734,645. The addition (55,878 GSF) was built in 1987 at a cost of $6.3m and was one of the first "infill" projects. This building was known as Commerce Hall from 1957 to May 1969. It was renamed Pamplin Hall in honor of Robert B. Pamplin Sr., class of 1933, then president and board chairman of Georgia-Pacific Corp. and university benefactor, and his son, Robert B. Pamplin Jr., businessman, philanthropist, minister, author, and recipient of university’s only honorary bachelor’s degree. Both men received honorary Doctor of Letters for outstanding service to and financial support of Virginia Tech in 1987.

Parking Services (built 1957, 5,490 GSF, 605 Research Center Drive)
The original building (3,912 GSF) was built in 1957 as a chicken coop and was known as the Teaching Lab. It was later renamed Human Resources Annex, Photographic Services, and then Parking Services as those departments moved in. The addition (1,578 GSF) was built in 2002 at a cost of $286,983.

Patton Hall (built 1929, 52,750 GSF, 750 Drillfield Drive)
The original building (first floor) was built in 1926. The remaining floors 2 through 4 were built in 1929 for a total cost of $208,275. It is named for William MacFarland Patton, head of civil engineering 1895-1905 and first dean of the Department of Engineering 1904-05.

Pavilion, The This wooden 60 x 90-ft. structure was completed in the summer 1879 and razed in March 1940. It was located near present junction of Main Street and the northeast corner of Alumni Mall. It was used as a drill hall and commencement hall 1879-94, mess hall 1893-94, commencement hall and gymnasium 1895, gymnasium 1894-1914, auditorium and dance hall 1915-23, gymnasium 1923-26, auditorium and dance hall 1926-40.

Payne Hall (built 1993, 68,556 GSF, 600 Washington Street SW)
This residence hall was built in 1993 at a cost of $7.975m. It is named for Alfred C. “Al” Payne, associate secretary of YMCA 1946-49, YMCA secretary 1958-64, assistant to dean of students 1964-70, counselor of religious affairs 1970-81. Current occupant: coed.

Pearson Hall (built 2015, 111,191 GSF, 260 Alumni Mall)
The original name of this residence hall was Rasche Hall Replacement. It was renamed to Pearson Hall in April, 2015 in honor of James (J) and Renae Pearson. Current occupant: coed; Corps of Cadets.

Peddrew-Yates Hall (built 1998, 63,195 GSF, 610 Washington Street SW)
This residence hall was built in 1998 at a cost of $8,403,000 and was originally known as New Residence Hall West—Payne Site. It was dedicated on March 29, 2002. It was renamed Peddrew-Yates Hall during the dedication in honor of Irving L. Peddrew, the first black student to attend Virginia Tech 1952-1955, and Charlie L. Yates, the first black graduate, who earned a B.S. degree with honors in 1957; associate professor 1979-83; member, board of visitors 1983-87; associate professor 1987-2000. Current occupant: coed.

Perry Street Parking Garage (built 2010, 418,000 GSF, 1330 Perry Street)
This building was built in 2010 for a cost of $24,030,000. The photovoltaic arrays were added on the roof in 2012 for a cost of $1,300,000. Total parking spaces: 1,350: 2014 count from parking services: F/S: 111; C/G: 1215; ADA: 24.

Power House (built 1928, 35,371 GSF, 350 Old Turner Street)
The original building (13,418 GSF) was built in 1928 at a cost of $167,000. An addition (3,149 GSF) was built in 1938. An addition (3,227 GSF) was built in 1949 at a cost of $459,710. An addition (1,003 GSF) was built in 1955 at a cost of $60,000. An addition (5,537 GSF) was built in 1960 at a cost of $600,162. An addition (1,837 GSF) was built in 1971 (boiler plant) at a cost of $300,790. An addition (7,200 GSF) was built in 1998 at a cost of $10,744,800 to add a coal-fired boiler. One coal boiler was modified in 2007 and equipped with scrubber and baghouse at a cost of $5,850,000.

Power Plant The first power plant was completed February 1900; it was enlarged to three 100-horsepower boilers, three steam engines, and two dynamos by 1903. More equipment was added in 1905. One 180 kw electric generator was added and two 300-horsepower engines replaced the old steam engines in 1909. It was located on site of present day Thomas Hall. The plant was relocated and remodeled 1918-22. A new brick stack was built and new boilers installed at the new location on the upper quadrangle in 1919. New engines, generators, and electric equipment were installed in 1920. Two motor-generator sets were installed in 1922. Two 250-horsepower boilers were added in 1924. One 250-horsepower boiler was added in 1927. Underground steam tunnels were expanded to all campus buildings by the 1928-29 academic year.

Price Hall (built 1907, 55,955 GSF, 170 Drillfield Drive)
This building was built in 1907 at a cost of $20,948 and was originally called Agricultural Hall or "Old Aggie".

Price House (built 1924, 4,030 GSF, 401 Barger Street)
This house (4,030 GSF) was originally built in 1924. It was demolished on 11/19/2004.

Preston and Olin Building

Price.

Pritchard Hall (built 1967, 211,481 GSF, 630 Washington Street SW)
Construction of this residence hall was started 1965 and completed in 1967 at a cost of $3,262,240. A portion opened in the winter of 1967; the entire building was not completed until fall 1967. It was dedicated on May 13, 1968, and is named for Samuel R. Pritchard, professor and head of physics and electrical engineering 1893-35 and dean of engineering 1918-28. Current occupant: coed.

Public Safety Building (built 2002, 24,732 GSF, 330 Sterrett Drive)
This building was built in 2002 at a cost of $2,925,000. The original name of the building was Southgate Center Addition. It was renamed to the Public Safety Building in July, 2013, when the Virginia Tech Police department and Emergency Services department moved in. It is leased from the Virginia Tech Foundation.

Randolph Hall (built 1959, 165,918 GSF, 460 Old Turner Street)
The original building (the west section) was built in 1952 (80,685 GSF) at a cost of $884,070. The addition (the east section) was built in 1959 (85,233 GSF) at a cost of $889,944. The building is named for Lingan S. Randolph, professor of mechanical engineering 1893-1918 and dean of engineering 1912-18. Attached to the building is a six-foot stability wind tunnel acquired from the National Aeronautic and Space Administration in 1958 and made part of Randolph Hall in 1959 at a cost of $900,000. The wind tunnel was valued at $1 million at the time and was acquired for about $1,700 as surplus equipment.

Rasche Hall (built 1957, 62,491 GSF, 260 Alumni Mall)
The original portion of the residence hall was built in 1894 at a cost of $13,467 and was known as Barracks Number 2; it was remodeled in 1957 at a cost of $148,291. The addition was built in 1957 at a cost of $552,973 on the site of the First Academic Building which was razed in 1957. This residence hall housed cadets for over 100 years. Demolition of this building began on November 11, 2013 and was completed December 12, 2013. It was named for William H. “Bosco” Rasche, professor of mechanism and descriptive geometry 1895-1951.

Reed House (Price’s Fork Road)
This house was demolished (date unknown) to allow for the widening of Price’s Fork Road.

Robeson Hall (built 1960, 66,138 GSF, 850 West Campus Drive)
This building was built in 1960 at a cost of $992,385. It was originally named the Physics Building until 1968 when renamed in honor of Frank L. Robeson, head of physics department 1923-54. Dedicated June 7, 1969. It originally housed a small nuclear reactor (UTR-10 argonaut-type reactor built in 1960 and upgraded to 100,000 watts in 1966) near room 10. The reactor was removed in 1988.

Rock House (also known as Administration Building and Alwood House) The native stone structure built as residence for Prof. J. A. Norton; it was later occupied by Prof. William B. Alwood. John Hart, professor, reportedly lived in the house during his one-year tenure as acting president of VAMC 1880-81. In 1889 the offices of the president, commandant, secretary, and treasurer were moved into the house, which was located in northern section of the present-day Drillfield. It was mostly destroyed by fire on Feb. 2, 1900, destroying all records of the college, reports of faculty, minute books of board of visitors, and other materials. Offices were moved to Faculty House number 3, residence of commandant of cadets. Rock House rebuilt to house administrative offices and occupied April 1904-July 1936, when offices were moved to newly completed Teaching and Administration Building, later renamed Burruss Hall. It was razed in the summer of 1950 to make way for approaches to the War Memorial, although stones were saved to be used in construction of memorial, which got under way in 1951.

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Sandy Hall (built 1924, 12,343 GSF, 210 Drillfield Drive)
This building was built in 1924 at a cost of $50,602 and was originally known as the Agricultural Extension Building. It was renamed for Thomas O. Sandy, state demonstration agent 1907-17, Virginia’s first agricultural extension agent, and extension employee 1914-17.

Sardo Laboratory (built 1976, 8,724 GSF, 1650 Research Center Drive)
The original building (8,004 GSF) was built in 1976 at a cost of $235,000. An addition (720 GSF) of a loft in room 116 was built in 1991.

Saunders Hall (built 1931, 31,043 GSF, 490 West Campus Drive)
This building was built in 1931 at a cost of $150,000, it was originally known as the Dairy Husbandry Building until it was renamed to Saunders Hall in 1949.

Science Hall (Barracks No. 7) This building was first occupied September 1901. It housed departments of general chemistry, geology, mineralogy, physics, and biology. It burned on February 1905 at a loss of $125,000, but was rebuilt and occupied in October 1905. It was remodeled in 1927 into Barracks No. 7. It was razed 1957 to make room for the new section of Shanks Hall. It was a large brick building, three stories plus basement and attic.

Second Academic Building The cornerstone for this two-story 135 x 45-ft. brick building was laid on Aug. 12, 1875, was constructed at a cost of $18,000. It was first occupied May 1877. It housed the college library from 1877 to 1914 and various other departments from time to time. It was demolished in 1957 to make way for new section of Brodie Hall.

Seed House [Golf Course] (built 1940, 954 GSF, Duck Pond Drive)

Seismograph Building (built 1962, 709 GSF, 1044 Research Center Drive)
This building is an underground reinforced concrete structure. It is one of 125 identical stations making up the "Vela Uniform Program" of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The building contains six seismometers mounted on concrete piers which connect directly to bedrock 3.5 feet below. The recorder is located in the Geological Sciences Department in Derring Hall.

Seitz Hall (built 1940, 51,000 GSF, 155 Ag Quad Lane)
This building was built in 1940 at a cost of $172,000 and was originally known as the Agricultural Engineering Building. It was named in 1956 in memory of Charles E. Seitz, professor and head of agricultural engineering 1914-54.

Shanks Hall (built 1957, 64,175 GSF, 181 Turner Street NW)
The original portion of this residence hall was built in 1902 at a cost of about $18,000 and was known as Barracks Number 4. The original residence hall was renovated in 1957 at a cost of $142,567. The addition was built in 1957 at a cost of $556,386 on the site of Barracks Number 7, which was razed in 1957. The residence hall housed 320 men until it was converted to house 302 women in the fall of 1970. An addition (8,762 GSF) was built in 2001 at a cost of $7,671,000 to convert the building to an academic building to house the English and communication departments. It is named for D. C. Shanks, commandant of cadets 1895-98.

Shultz Dining Hall Former dining hall. Completed 1962; 55,390 gross sq. ft.; cost $1,069,925. First used September 1962. Adorned on front by decorative aluminum seals crafted by Armento Architectural Arts, Buffalo, N. Y. It was named in 1962 for John Henry Shultz, mess steward 1898-1912. It closed as a dining hall in May 2012 to become part of the Center for the Arts at Virginia Tech, now the Moss Arts Center.

Sigma Phi Epsilon House—Transfer House (built 2013, 20,508 GSF, 2475 Oak Lane)
This building was built in 2012 for a cost of $4m. This building was built with and for the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. The fraternity was banned from campus from 2013 to 2015; during this time the "Innovate Living-Learning Community" (coed) occupied the building.

Skelton Conference Center (built 2005, 75,071 GSF, 901 Price’s Fork Road)
The center is part of the complex that includes The Inn at Virginia Tech and the Holtzman Alumni Center. It opened July 10, 2005, and was dedicated on Oct. 28, 2005. It is named for William E. and Margaret G. Skelton. William Skelton, class of 1940, was state 4-H agent, 1950-62; director/dean, Virginia Cooperative Extension, 1965-76; recipient of Ruffner Medal. Margaret Skelton was a faculty member and director, Cooperative Extension Family Resource Program in the College of Home Economics.

Slusher Hall (built 1972, 125,868 GSF, 201 Ag Quad Lane)
This residence hall was built in 1972 at a cost of $3,395,144. The three-story wing opened in the fall of 1972 and the 12-story tower opened in the fall of 1974. It was dedicated May 3, 1974. It is named in memory of Clarice Slusher (Pritchard), class of 1927, registrar 1937-62. Current occupant: coed.

Smith Career Center (built 2004, 21,735 GSF, 870 Washington Street SW)
This building was built in 2004 at a cost of $4,608,000. It was dedicated on Oct. 20, 2007 and is occupied by the Career and Professional Development office. It is named for Garnett E. and Patsy T. Smith. Garnet Smith, a native of Southwest Virginia, retired as CEO of Advance Auto Parts in 2000.

Smith House (built 1930, 1,542 GSF, Old Turner Street)
This building was originally built in 1930 as a private residence on Turner Street. It was acquired by the university in 1969 and provided office space for a variety of departments. It was demolished on 06/25/2004.

Smyth Hall (built 1939, 54,073 GSF, 185 Ag Quad Lane)
The original building (27,654 GSF) was built in 1939 at a cost of $127,650. Two additions were built in 1950 at a cost of $485,300: one was 7,631 GSF and the other was 18,788 GSF. This building was originally known as the Natural Science Building. It was named in 1949 for Ellison Adger Smyth Jr., professor and founding head of Department of Biology 1891-1925 and first dean of the faculty 1902-06.

Sochinski-McKee Marching Virginians Center (built 2015, 12,013 GSF, 821 Southgate Drive)
This building was originally named the Marching Virginians Practice Facility. The building was renamed by the Board of Visitors on March 21, 2016 to the Sochinski-McKee Marching Virginians Center to honor Dr. James Sochinski, Director of the Marching Virginians from 1976 to 1981, and Mr. David McKee, Director of the Marching Virginians from 1986 to present.

Solar House (built 1952, 13,097 GSF, 577-B Research Center Drive)
This building was originally known as a Laying House.

Solitude (built 1851, 5,133 GSF, 705 West Campus Drive)
According to Gib Worsham’s historic building report, Solitude was built in 1801, probably by Philip Barger, sold to James Patton Preston in 1803, who sold it (only a log cabin at that time) to his uncle Granville Smith (his mother was Susanna Smith Preston, where Smithfield gets its name). In 1807 it was sold back to the Prestons, and in 1822 Robert and Mary Preston acquired the property. They developed it in 1851 into the Greek Revival house that we see today. This building is the oldest structure still standing on campus. The original log pen portion of the house (south side) is believed to date to 1801 and a wing was built about 1834 by Col. Robert Preston; the frame addition (front) was built about 1851 which more than doubled the size of the house. The house and surrounding land (250 acres) was purchased by the Board of Visitors in October 1872 for $21,250. It was used as faculty housing in the 1920s-40s and again 1951-74; as a student infirmary in the late 1800s; a veteran’s club following World War II when trailers for veteran housing surrounded it 1946-1950; a clubhouse for Hokie Club activities; classroom and office space in 1974; and housing for Appalachian Studies 1988-90s. The building was placed in the Virginia Landmarks Register in 1988 and in the National Register of Historic Places in 1989. The small upper pond adjacent to the house and the Duck Pond, known as the "Ice Pond," is located on or near the site of the infamous Drapers Meadow Massacre from which Mary Draper Ingles was taken captive by the Shawnee Indians in 1755.

Southgate Center (built 1987, 57,795 GSF, 330 Sterrett Drive)
Addition completed 2002; 24,732 sq. ft.; cost $2,925,000. A portion of the building serves as a warehouse and bake shop for Dining Services. The building housed Human Resources, Purchasing, and finance offices until they relocated to the North End Center.

Squires Student Center (built 1969, 235,248 GSF, 290 College Avenue)
The original building (54,366 GSF) was built in 1937 at a cost of $224,750 and was originally called the Student Activities Building; it was renamed to Squires Hall in 1949 for John H. Squires 1905 in recognition of his donation of $10,000 toward the structure. Civilian students had their dining hall in the building from September 1937 to September 1939. An addition (108,482 GSF) was built in 1969 at a cost of $3.5m, which surrounded the original building and the building was renamed to Squires Student Center. An addition (72,400 GSF) was built in 1991 at a cost of $17m; the accompanying renovation revealed portions of the original building’s facade.

Steger Hall—North Wing (built 2004, 71,560 GSF, 1015 Life Science Circle)
The building was originally built in 2004 at a cost of $24,394,000 and was called Bioinformatics Facility Phase 2. It was renamed to Biocomplexity Institute Phase 2 in December, 2015; and then renamed to Steger Hall—North Wing on August 29, 2016 by the Board of Visitors.

Steger Hall—South Wing (built 2003, 58,285 GSF, 1015 Life Science Circle)
The building was originally built in 2003 at a cost of $21,864,000 and was called Bioinformatics Facility Phase 1. It was renamed to Biocomplexity Institute Phase 1 in December, 2015; and then renamed to Steger Hall—South Wing on August 29, 2016 by the Board of Visitors.

Sterrett Center (built 1958, 75,891 GSF, 230 Sterrett Drive)
The original name of this building was Maintenance Building. The original building (75,521 sq. ft.) was built in 1958. An addition was built in 2013. It houses offices and shops of maintenance workers, carpenters, facility engineers, architects, and other support services. It is named for William M. Sterrett Sr., director of buildings and grounds, who retired in 1981.

Student Services Building (built 2003, 36,385 GSF, 800 Washington Street SW)
This building was built in 2003 at a cost of $6,755,000. It is leased from the Virginia Tech Foundation. It is occupied by offices of bursar, registrar, and Hokie Passport.

Surge Space Building (built 2007, 45,000 GSF, 400 Stanger Street)
This building was built in 2007 at a cost of $7,241,000 and is used to temporarily house academic and/or administrative units whose regular facilities are undergoing renovation. It is currently primarily a classroom building.

The Grove [President’s House] (built 1902, 15,147 GSF, 730 Duck Pond Drive)
The original house was built in 1902 in Colonial Revival style as the President’s house and Dr. John McBryde moved in. The original president’s house was what eventually became Henderson Hall. All presidents after McBryde lived here until 1971, when president T. Marshall Hahn Jr. constructed a private residence off campus. This building then housed offices for the Center for the Study of Public Choice. It was completely renovated in 1989 at a cost of $610,000 when Dr. Jim McComas became university president and moved in. The building was renovated again in 2000 at a cost of $580,000. The building was originally known as the President’s House; in 1971 it was known simply as Building 274; and in 1988 it was renamed The Grove, which initially applied to trees surrounding the home.

The Grove Carriage House (built 1902, 386 GSF, 730 Duck Pond Drive)

The Grove Garage (built 2000, 888 GSF, 730 Duck Pond Drive)

The Inn At Virginia Tech (built 2005, 88,746 GSF, 901 Price’s Fork Road)
The building is part of a complex that includes the Skelton Conference Center and the Holtzman Alumni Center. The construction cost was $43,118,000, with The Inn at Virginia Tech and Skelton Conference Center cost approximately $33 million of that figure. It is located on 25 acres of land that was formerly part of the front nine holes of the golf course. (see Golf Course under Athletic Facilities). Among the facilities are 147 guest rooms, 23,705 sq. ft. of meeting space, a restaurant, a lounge, and two private dining rooms. It opened July 10, 2005 and was dedicated Oct. 28, 2005. It is operated by Hilton Hotels. Adjoins Skelton Conference Center and Holtzman Alumni Center. Complex total area 191,360 sq. ft. See Skelton Conference Center and Holtzman Alumni Center.

Temporary Buildings Buildings 361, 362, 363, and 364 were tagged "Temporary Buildings" on campus maps in the 1950s. They were located behind current Williams Hall, in the area now occupied by Pamplin, Robeson, and Derring Halls.

Theater 101 (built 2009, 8,479 GSF, 200 College Avenue)
This building was built in 2009 at a cost of $3,700,000. This building was originally called Black Box Theater. This building and the adjacent Henderson Hall, renovated at the same time, are the university’s first LEED-certified buildings.

Thomas Hall (built 1949, 37,775 GSF, 191 Turner Street NW)
The original residence hall was built in 1949 at a cost of $427,185. It was completely renovated in 1970. The original power house was located on this site; it was built in 1900 for use as a heating and electric power plant. Current occupant: coed; Corps of Cadets.

Torgersen Hall (built 2000, 149,651 GSF, 620 Drillfield Drive)
This building was originally called "ACITC" (Advanced Communications and Information Technology Center). It was built in 2000 at a cost of $26,942,000. It includes 30 miles of fiber-optic cable and 75 miles of copper cable. It joins Newman Library via an enclosed bridge across Alumni Mall. It was named in 2000 for Paul E. Torgersen, head of industrial engineering 1967-70, dean of engineering 1970-90, president of the Corporate Research Center 1990-94, and 14th president 1994-2000.

Trailer Camps There were three trailer camps to provide housing for the influx of veterans returning after World War II (especially married veterans). The first camp was established in the winter quarter of 1946 adjacent to Solitude, which became a community center. This camp was informally known as "Vetsville." The second and third camps were established on the south side of campus, along today’s Washington Street where Cassell Coliseum and the basketball practice facility are located. Trailer Camp 3 was informally known as "Cassell Heights" for Stuart Cassell, the college business manager. Trailer Camp 2 was named "Hurricane Hill" by its residents. The camps were eventually dismantled when new residence halls were completed.

University Bookstore (built 1975, 40,529 GSF, 115 Kent Street)
The original building (40,054 GSF) was built in 1975 at a cost of $1.4m and was designed to resemble the shape of the state of Virginia. The addition (ATM room - 475 GSF) was built in 1984. The university’s book store is located in this building and was formerly located in the basement of Owens Hall.

University City Office Building and Annex (built 1978, 32,476 GSF, 700 University City Blvd.)
The university leased space in this building for a variety of academic and administrative offices, but terminated the lease in 1991 due to the "Bad air syndrome" in the building. The building was extensively renovated and again houses university offices.

University Club (built 1930, 8,763 sq-ft., 100 Otey St. SW)
A faculty group organized the club in 1925 and constructed a clubhouse on land leased by the university. Construction was completed in 1930 at a cost of $38,000. During one period, it contained a dining room, which ceased operations in September 1935 when Faculty Center (see Graduate Life Center at Donaldson Brown) dining room opened.

Vawter Hall (built 1962, 58,852 GSF, 180 Kent Street)
This residence hall was built in 1962 at a cost of $1,000,872 and dedicated May 16, 1966. It is named in 1962 for Charles Erastus Vawter, a member of the board of visitors 1886-1900 and rector of the board 1891-1900. The residence hall has a z-like floor layout, unlike any of the other residence halls. Current occupant: coed.

Vet Med Instructional Addition (built 2012, 24,165 GSF, 215 Duck Pond Drive)
This building was built in 2012 for a cost of $14m. It includes a 7,400-square-foot surgical space for second- and third-year veterinary students as well as faculty offices, student seminar space, small conference areas, and an outdoor patio overlooking the veterinary college grounds. Construction began in the summer of 2011 and the building opened in time for the arrival of the new class in August of 2012.

Vet Med Phase 1 (built 1981, 35,960 GSF, 285 Duck Pond Drive)
Phase 1a (24,505 GSF) is known as the Small Animal Facility. Phase 1b (11,455 GSF) is known as the Large Animal Facility. This building (both phases) was built in 1981 at a cost of $1m.

Vet Med Phase 2 (built 1983, 70,790 GSF, 205 Duck Pond Drive)
The original building (68,764 GSF) was built in 1983 at a cost of $8m. The addition (2,026 GSF) was built in 1998 to add classroom 125.

Vet Med Phase 3 (built 1983, 66,640 GSF, 245 Duck Pond Drive)
Phase 3 is 59,018 GSF; the tunnel is 7,622 GSF. This building was built in 1987 at a cost of $8m.

Vet Med Phase 4a [Large Animal Isolation] (built 1990, 1,774 GSF, 285 Duck Pond Drive)

Vet Med Phase 4b (built 1990, 7,508 GSF, 225 Duck Pond Drive)

Vet Med Phase 4c [Infectious Disease] (built 1995, 7,601 GSF, 1410 Price’s Fork Road)

Vet Med Phase 4c [Large Animal Hospital] (built 1994, 8,323 GSF, 285 Duck Pond Drive)

Vet Med Phase 4c [Non-Client Animal] (built 1995, 35,884 GSF, 225 Duck Pond Drive)
The original building (33,068 GSF) was built in 1995. An area (2,816 GSF) was reassigned to this building from building number 147 in 1990.

Vet Med Phase 4d (built 1993, 3,822 GSF, 245 Duck Pond Drive)

Veterinary Medical Research Center (built 1953, 11,280 GSF, 1410 Price’s Fork Road)
This building was originally called the Anaerobic Laboratory. The main facility for the Center For Molecular Medicine And Infectious Diseases houses bacteriologists, parasitologists, Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine adjunct faculty, and includes the Infectious Disease Unit.

Visitors and Undergraduate Admissions Center (built 2011, 18,155 GSF, 925 Price’s Fork Road)
This building replaced the house on Southgate Drive that served as the visitors center. It houses the Undergraduate Admissions offices, has an area that shows Virginia Tech history and current activities, and a small auditorium that is mainly used as a gathering place for campus tour groups.

Visitor Information Center (built 1942, 1,993 GSF, 1325 Southgate Drive)
Originally the Nester house, constructed in 1942; 1,993 sq. ft., located on another site and moved to the site on Southgate Drive. It was renovated in 1989 for use as a visitor center and parking services offices; opened 1990. Again renovated in 2001 after parking services vacated the facility. The first floor served as the Visitor Information Center; second floor provided offices for Licensing and Trademarks Administration, both part of University Relations. This building was demolished on 08/27/2012.

 

 

VT Airport Hangar (built 2016, 14,000 GSF, 1591 Research Center Drive)

 

Wallace Hall (built 1992, 103,163 GSF, 295 West Campus Drive)
The original building (49,256 GSF) was built in 1968 at a cost of $1.25m and consisted of the basement and first two floors. The addition (53,907 GSF) was built in 1992 at a cost of $7.6m and consisted of the top two floors and an atrium connecting to the additional space added to the rear of the building. It was rededicated Sept. 25, 1992. It is named for Maude E. Wallace, state home demonstration agent 1929-38 and assistant director of extension 1938-59.

 

War Memorial Chapel (built 1960, 6,324 GSF, 601 Drillfield Drive)
This building was originally called the World War II Memorial and Chapel. Construction was begun in 1951 and was completed in 1960 (after enough funds were raised )at a cost of $477,335. It was dedicated on May 29, 1960. The building was designed by Roy F. Larson of Harbeson, Hough, Livingston & Larson in Philadelphia. The upper level contains the Memorial Court with eight sculptured Indiana limestone pylons representing, from left to right, Brotherhood, Honor, Leadership, Sacrifice, Service, Loyalty, Duty, and Ut Prosim (the university motto: “That I May Serve”). Although the memorial initially was intended to honor only those Techmen killed in World War II, the names of alumni who have died in military conflicts beginning with World War I are now carved on the pylons. The four left pylons were designed by Henry Kries; the four right pylons were designed by Charles Rudy. Centered at the back of Memorial Court is a cenotaph, which contains names of the seven alumni awarded the Medal of Honor. The lower level of the memorial contains a 350-seat chapel, which includes a chancel sculpture symbolizing humankind’s relationship to the creator with a central group implying that something greater than humans is responsible for their presence on Earth. The left figure represents this relationship in daily life; the right figure suggests humans in communion with their creator. The chancel sculpture was designed by Donald DeLue. A 772-pipe organ was installed in the chapel in August 1962; cost $17,600. The pipes were made in Holland and range in size from a few inches to 16 feet in length. The War Memorial and Chapel were renovated in 2000-01 (among other work, air conditioning was added to the chapel) and it was rededicated on September 8, 2001.

War Memorial Gymnasium (built 1975, 200,961 GSF, 370 Drillfield Drive)
This building was originally called the World War I Memorial Gymnasium. The original building (91,592 GSF) was built in 1926 and the pool was added in 1933 (included in the original GSF) at a total cost of $436,710. The suspended track was removed in 1964. The gym section (61,800 GSF) was demolished in 1975 and only the front section was left. A new gym section (171,167 GSF) was built at a cost of $5.996m. This building has been used in the past for varsity basketball (1926-1961) and an auditorium, dance and exhibition hall, radio and television offices, and alumni association offices.

Weaver Baseball Center (built 2009, 12,000 GSF, 240 Duck Pond Drive)
This building was built in 2009 for a cost of $1,488,000. The original name was English Field Indoor Batting Facility. It was renamed to Weaver Baseball Facility in August, 2015.

Whittemore Hall (built 1971, 155,339 GSF, 1185 Perry Street)
The original building (floors 1 through 3: 78,460 GSF) was built in 1971 at a cost of $2,543,635 and was initially known as the Industrial and Electrical Engineering Laboratory. It was renamed to Whittemore Hall in 1968 for John W. Whittemore, faculty member 1928-63 and dean of engineering 1952-63. An addition (floors 4 through 6: 76,845 GSF) was built in 1985 at a cost of $7m. An addition (room 213 - 34 GSF) was built in 1992.

Williams Hall (built 1953, 46,848 GSF, 890 Drillfield Drive)
The building was originally built in 1953 at a cost of $611,514 and was completely renovated in 2003 at a cost of $5,700,000 for use by psychology department. The building was originally known as the Academic Science Building until it was named for John E. Williams, professor of mathematics and dean of the college 1923-43.

Wright House (built 1923, 4,221 GSF, 765 West Campus Drive)
This building (3,231 GSF) was originally built in 1923. An addition (990 GSF) was built in 1991.

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